Question 7. Does Venus & Mars Support the Greenhouse Effect? [Quorvita]

A. The Atmosphere of Venus Support the Greenhouse Effect?

The IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) reported that the temperatures on Venus and Mars provide proof of the greenhouse effect. However, the observed conditions on Venus are so factually dissimilar that it suggests a mechanism other than a greenhouse effect. Venus is the most volcanic planet in the solar system. The top of Venus’s atmosphere is completely surrounded by a white cloud of sulfuric acid crystals and liquid droplets that act as a thermal mirror, reflecting the volcanic heat back to the surface. Additionally, Venus has no ocean to modulate its temperature. Calculations show that there is no meaningful connection to a greenhouse effect on Venus.

B. The Atmosphere of Mars Support a Greenhouse Effect?

Mars has an atmosphere of almost 95% CO2, which is very similar to Venus. But it has a temperature of minus -60°C.  The explanation for this is that the Mars atmosphere is too thin.  However, the atmospheric pressure of Mars is very similar to the atmospheric pressure in the upper atmospheres of Earth, where the IPCC argues that CO2 does the majority of its greenhouse effect action.  However, that is inconsistent with the Mars position. Mars is cold because it is too far away from the sun; it has a mass one-tenth the size of Earth, with a gravity too small to hold a significant atmosphere; and it follows a wide elliptical orbit.  Additionally, Mars has no ocean to modulate its temperature. Calculations show that there is no meaningful connection to a greenhouse effect on Mars. 

C. What does Venus, Mars, and Earth Together Show Regarding the Greenhouse Effect

Mars and Venus have similar CO2 concentrations, at 95%, but their temperatures are +560°C apart.  Earth’s concentration of CO2 is a scant .04%, even though it is located directly between them.  Taking into account the relative locations from the sun, the atmospheric pressure ratios, and the amount of greenhouse gases, calculations show no correlation between the respective temperatures and levels of CO2. Scientific studies of many planets have reported that the greenhouse effect is not the cause of the temperature observations.  Instead, it is Earth’s massive oceans that have a modulating effect on this planet’s temperature.  

ANSWER TO QUESTION 7. [Quorvita]

 The greenhouse effect has no measurable effect on these planets, as supported by comparative analysis using observational data.  Venus is hot because it is the most volcanically active planet in the solar system; it has a sulfuric acid mirror encircling the planet, reflecting heat back to the surface; and CO2 does not absorb the infrared radiation rising from the Venusian surface.  Mars is cold because it is too far away from the Sun; it has one tenth the mass of Earth, making it unable to hold a thicker atmosphere; and it has a wide elliptical orbit.  Venus and Mars have no oceans to regulate the temperature.